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Seinfeld

The Soup Nazi

Seinfeld

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Seinfeld
Seinfeld

SYNOPSIS

While on the way to a soup stand whose demanding proprietor's harsh rules have led to him being referred to as "The Soup Nazi," Elaine stops to buy a sidewalk vendor's antique armoire. But when she's unable to move it into her building on a Sunday, she hires Kramer to watch it on the sidewalk overnight. Meanwhile, after George's request for extra bread causes the Soup Nazi to bar him from lunch, Elaine spots him in line trying again. While waiting, the two complain about Jerry's romantic behavior around his new girlfriend Sheila. And though George is successful in getting served this time, Elaine discovers just how tough the Soup Nazi can be when she's banned from eating there for two years.

Kramer loses the armoire to a pair of sophisticated furniture thieves. And when a kiss in line costs Sheila a delicious bowl of soup, Jerry is prompted to claim he doesn't know her. Pointing out that he chose a bowl of soup over a woman, Elaine suggests he's acting even stranger than George. However, Jerry thinks it's George who's been acting strange, which puts the Seinfeld-Costanza friendship to the test. Meanwhile, the Soup Nazi gives Kramer an old armoire he's been keeping in his basement.

Upon finding him making amends with Sheila, George decides to make a point about Jerry's romantic antics. But when he tries using his own silly terms of endearment with his fiancee Susan, George doesn't anticipate just how much she'll like it. Meanwhile, when her thank you for the armoire enrages the Soup Nazi, Elaine is determined to get revenge for his rudeness. And the recipes she's found hidden in his old armoire provide just the ammunition. Finally, as Jerry announces he's breaking up with Sheila after all, the Soup Nazi closes up shop for good, much to the dismay of his loyal customers.

Seinfeld
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Spike Feresten based the character of The Soup Nazi on Al Yeganah, the owner of a soup stand near the Ed Sullivan Theater.

The real-life Soup Nazi was unhappy with the publicity he received for having a sitcom character based upon him. A headline in a tabloid quoted Al Yeganah as saying that he's going to "smack" Jerry Seinfeld's face.

This episode marks the first appearance of Cedric and Bob, the two gay toughs who frighten Kramer off in the street. Played by John Paragon and Yul Vazquez, the two would return in later episodes such as "The Sponge" and "The Puerto Rican Day."

An addition to the coffee shop scene in which Jerry and George compete to see who can be the most affectionate was cut for time. The coffee shop manager approached them and asked them not to make-out in his shop. In the broadcast version, the manager can still be seen looking at them disapprovingly in the background as the two couples kiss.

Spike Feresten recalls how the Soup Nazi became a Seinfeld episode: "When you're pitching, Larry and Jerry don't want to hear pitches, they want to hear stories. And I ended up pitching stories that first meeting, and then stopped and found myself telling the story of "The Soup Nazi," just after the fact, just conversationally. And I didn't know I was pitching at the time, and they said, "Write that first." And I was very surprised. I was caught off guard by that, because that wasn't an original pitch. It was just an anecdote.

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GEORGE:

"I didn't get any bread."

JERRY:

"Just forget it. Let it go."

GEORGE:

"Um, excuse me, I, I think you forgot my bread."

SOUP NAZI:

"Bread, two dollars extra."

GEORGE:

"Two dollars? But everyone in front of me got free bread."

SOUP NAZI:

"You want bread?"

GEORGE:

"Yes, please."

SOUP NAZI:

"Three dollars!"

GEORGE:

"What?"

SOUP NAZI:

"No soup for you!"

Seinfeld
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